Gender, Race, and Sexuality in Technoscience

IDS 2202 : Tangents: Life Politics

SOC 2850: Constructions of Gender

Sociological introduction to the effects of gender on social relations and contemporary social issues. Major topics include socialization, women as a minority group, work and family, interpersonal power, and law. Historical and cross-cultural analyses also are included. (Social Sciences; Writing; Women's Studies)

IDS 3000: Histories of Knowledges

This course introduces central concerns of interdisciplinary studies through analyses of histories of knowledge production, definition, and categorization, cultural derivations and influences on what we know, the significance of paradigms and media, and the importance of perspective and situation in shaping what we define as knowledge. (Writing; Multi-Cultural; Cross-Disciplinary)

IDS 3700:  Cyberactivism and Cyberliberties

WS 2400: Distinguished Lectures on Women, Sex, and Gender

This unique course introduces students to a variety of topics and methods of investigation in the study of women's and gender issues. Each Thursday students will attend a lecture given by a scholar from a different discipline. Students will have assignments and readings designed around each lecture and will meet on Tuesdays with the instructor of the course to interpret and analyze the featured lectures. This course stresses the importance of taking women and gender seriously for understanding a variety of real-world issues. (Multi-Cultural; Cross-Disciplinary)

  • TEENAGE GIRLS AND INTERNET PREDATORS
  • WOMEN AND CAREERS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
  • MEN AND MASCULINITY IN TODAY'S JOB MARKET
  • RAPE AND BINGE DRINKING ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES
  • THE "GENDER" OF SCHOOL SHOOTINGS
  • WS 3300: Gender and Technology

    This course is a social study of the mutual shaping of gender and technology. Beginning with the assumption that technologies are not gender neutral in their design or effects, the course examines both gender and technology as cultural and political categories. Students study how technologies help to form and distinguish the realm of the masculine and the feminine, as well as how ideas about gender help form our views of technology. Students will also examine the impact of new technologies, such as new information and communication technologies, on contemporary gender relations.(Multi-Cultural; Cross-Disciplinary; Computer)

    WS 5650: Graduate Seminar - Feminist Theories

    This course surveys a wide range of contemporary feminist theories explaining the origins, dynamics, and transformation of gender-based inequalities. It examines the intellectual roots of modern feminist theories as well as feminist attempts to overhaul its intellectual roots. Students will be introduced to the connections between feminist theories and other academic debates, and they will also study political movements that reach beyond the oppression of women per se. This course examines not only the feminist revisions of and impact on academic discourse but also related intellectual trends and political movements such as postmodernism, deconstruction, poststructuralist theory, postcolonial theory, and critiques of liberalism, humanism, and Marxism.

    WS 5600: Graduate Seminar - Feminist Perspectives on Pedagogy and Academe

    This course examines the feminist project in university education: the history of women’s studies; the equality of women and members of other marginalized groups; gendered power within academic contexts; women in academic and administrative positions; tensions between various groups with emancipatory knowledge seeking projects; and feminist pedagogical practices. Students will examine autobiographical and other materials about the history, place, and progress of women in teaching, research, and administrative positions at American universities. Students will reflect on their own disciplines through an interdisciplinary scholarly lens. Students will be introduced to both professional opportunities and tensions in women’s studies specifically and in academia more broadly.

    Graduate Seminar - Science, Technology, and the Body